Photo
gardnerhill:

thetaylornetwork:

Watson and Holmes optioned for a movie
The Eisner-nominated Watson And Holmes comic book published by New Paradigm Studios has been optioned by Feather Films for a live action feature film.

SHRIEK
*ahem*
That’s wonderful news.
In the meantime, read the comic, it’s great.

gardnerhill:

thetaylornetwork:

Watson and Holmes optioned for a movie

The Eisner-nominated Watson And Holmes comic book published by New Paradigm Studios has been optioned by Feather Films for a live action feature film.

SHRIEK

*ahem*

That’s wonderful news.

In the meantime, read the comic, it’s great.

(via leupagus)

Photo
rumregrets:

bird0fhermes:

I’m crying oh my fucking god

AHAHAHAHAHA

rumregrets:

bird0fhermes:

I’m crying oh my fucking god

AHAHAHAHAHA

(Source: omg-humor, via rcmclachlan)

Photo
thecityhorse:

adriofthedead:

swearbythefrecklesonthemoon:

chekhovs:

The Animal Rescue Site is having trouble getting enough people to click on it daily so they can meet their quota of getting FREE FOOD donated every day to abused and neglected animals in their shelters.
It takes less than a minute (only about 15 seconds actually) to go to their site and click on the purple box titled, ‘Click Here to Give - it’s FREE!’. Every click gives about .6 bowls of food to sheltered dogs. You can also click daily!
Keep in mind that this does not cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate food to abandoned/neglected animals in exchange for advertising. [via.]
Go to the website HERE.

It’s just a click… takes about 1 or 2 seconds.

there’s no pop-up ads or anything on the site
just click it once and you’re done

if all of my followers click, it’s more than a few thousand meals so.. please?

thecityhorse:

adriofthedead:

swearbythefrecklesonthemoon:

chekhovs:

The Animal Rescue Site is having trouble getting enough people to click on it daily so they can meet their quota of getting FREE FOOD donated every day to abused and neglected animals in their shelters.

It takes less than a minute (only about 15 seconds actually) to go to their site and click on the purple box titled, ‘Click Here to Give - it’s FREE!’. Every click gives about .6 bowls of food to sheltered dogs. You can also click daily!

Keep in mind that this does not cost you a thing. Their corporate sponsors/advertisers use the number of daily visits to donate food to abandoned/neglected animals in exchange for advertising. [via.]

Go to the website HERE.

It’s just a click… takes about 1 or 2 seconds.

there’s no pop-up ads or anything on the site

just click it once and you’re done

if all of my followers click, it’s more than a few thousand meals so.. please?

(Source: hamandheroin, via siterlas)

Photoset
Quote
"'Discworld' is taking something that you know is ridiculous and treating it as if it is serious, to see if something interesting happens when you do so."

— Terry Pratchett (via thetaintedking)

(via twin-city-ankh-and-morpork)

Link

sun-thief-rai:

questionall:

* Panel issues recommendations after review of U.S. record

* Says killing of Michael Brown “not an isolated event”

* Decries racial bias of police, pervasive discrimination

* ACLU calls for addressing racial inequality in America

GENEVA, Aug 29 (Reuters) - The U.N. racism watchdog urged the United States on Friday to halt the excessive use of force by police after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman touched off riots in Ferguson, Missouri.

Minorities, particularly African Americans, are victims of disparities, the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) said after examining the U.S. record.

"Racial and ethnic discrimination remains a serious and persistent problem in all areas of life from de facto school segregation, access to health care and housing," Noureddine Amir, CERD committee vice chairman, told a news briefing.

Teenager Michael Brown was shot dead by a white police officer on Aug. 9, triggering violent protests that rocked Ferguson - a St. Louis suburb - and shone a global spotlight on the state of race relations in America.

"The excessive use of force by law enforcement officials against racial and ethnic minorities is an ongoing issue of concern and particularly in light of the shooting of Michael Brown," said Amir, an expert from Algeria.

"This is not an isolated event and illustrates a bigger problem in the United States, such as racial bias among law enforcement officials, the lack of proper implementation of rules and regulations governing the use of force, and the inadequacy of training of law enforcement officials."

The panel of 18 independent experts grilled a senior U.S. delegation on Aug. 13 about what they said was persistent racial discrimination against African-Americans and other minorities, including within the criminal justice system.

U.S. Ambassador Keith Harper told the panel that his nation had made “great strides toward eliminating racial discrimination” but conceded that “we have much left to do”.

Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot Brown, has been put on paid leave and is in hiding. A St. Louis County grand jury has begun hearing evidence and the U.S. Justice Department has opened its own investigation.

Police have said Brown struggled with Wilson when shot. But some witnesses say Brown held up his hands and was surrendering when he was shot multiple times in the head and chest.

"STAND YOUR GROUND" LAWS

In its conclusions issued on Friday, the U.N. panel said “Stand Your Ground” Laws, a controversial self-defense statute in 22 U.S. states, should be reviewed to “remove far-reaching immunity and ensure strict adherence to principles of necessity and proportionality when deadly force is used for self-defense”.

Ron Davis, father of Jordan Davis, a 17-year-old shot dead in a car in Jacksonville, Florida during an argument over loud rap music in November 2012, attended the Geneva session. Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen killed in Miami, Florida by a neighborhood watch volunteer, testified.

The U.N. panel monitors compliance with a treaty ratified by 177 countries including the United States.

"The Committee remains concerned at the practice of racial profiling of racial or ethnic minorities by law enforcement officials, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Transportation Security Administration, border enforcement officials and local police," it said, urging investigations.

The experts called for addressing obstacles faced by minorities and indigenous peoples to exercise their right to vote effectively. This was due to restrictive voter identification laws, district gerrymandering and state-level laws that disenfranchise people convicted of felonies, it said.

Jamil Dakwar of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said the U.N. recommendations highlighted “shortcomings on racial equality that we are seeing play out today on our streets, at our borders and in the voting booth.

"When it comes to human rights, the United States must practice at home what it preaches abroad," he said.

THIS IS GOOD.

THIS IS REAL GOOD.

(via alchemicalalice)

Tags: YES GOOD
Quote
"When I was doing my first movie, the only thing I knew is that I wanted a female editor. Because I just felt a female editor would be more nurturing. To the movie and to me. They wouldn’t try to be winning their way just to win their way, all right? They wouldn’t be trying to shove their agenda or win their battles with me. They would be nurturing me through this process."

Quentin Tarantino, “The Cutting Edge: The Magic of Movie Editing”

Film editing is one of those positions that women take because they can’t get hired as directors. Kind of like how women in the comics industry end up as colorists because noone wants them as the headline artist.

How many great directors have partnered consistently with female editors? A lot of them. Scorsese is a great example. Thelma Schoonmaker has edited every single one of his films since 1980, starting with Raging Bull. She is instrumental to his success. But is she a household name like Scorsese is? Of course not.

Imagine a world where she directed her own films, and what those films could have been like. I’m not saying all film editors wish they were directors or anything. But it’s no coincidence that the position most open to female moviemakers is the most unsung, and that’s part of why there are so few female directors today.

(via rubyvroom)

(Source: mswyrr, via rob-anybody)

Photo
jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ
This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall
it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

jumpingjacktrash:

becausegoodheroesdeservekidneys:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts follow Ultrafacts

YOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO

Senegal, Mauritania, Mali, Burkina Faso, Niger, Nigeria, Chad, Sudan, Eritrea, Ethiopia, and Djibouti. Those are the countries. It will be drought-resistant species, mostly acacias. And this is a fucking brilliant idea you have no idea oh my Christ

This will create so many jobs and regenerate so many communities and aaaaaahhhhhhh

more info here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Green_Wall

it’s already happening, and already having positive effects. this is wonderful, why have i not heard of this before? i’m so happy!

(via bending-sickle)

Photoset

zombres:

kitoky:

I need you to protect me. Can you do that?

Fine, fandom. You don’t want to gif Mako and Stacker? I’ll fucking gif Mako and Stacker, because if there was ever a relationship that carried the emotional impact of a film, it’s fucking this one. Without a doubt, we saw their relationship from start to finish and it was complete with a role reversal. Stacker protected Mako in Tokyo, and now she’s protecting him on Operation Pitfall. And this scene is just my absolute favorite because Stacker’s a soldier from top to bottom, but here we genuinely see the father that he’s become to Mako and the person she looks up to and the one she gets her strength and drive from. And without words, although the words hurt just as much, they managed to destroy me emotionally with this small gesture, a you-blink-and-you-miss-it moment: Stacker saying to Mako, “Hey. [We’ve got a job to do, let’s go do it.]” A subtle tipping of her chin; a quick, inconsequential shrug of his shoulders, and immediately Mako straightens, squares her shoulders, taking his strength as hers and they’re ready. They’re ready to save the world together. In Pacific Rim: Tales From Year Zero, Stacker comments that young Mako reminded him of himself; “Quiet, serious.” Based on this, I feel like their relationship is significantly based on their body language, and how they conduct themselves around each other. There were just volumes that were spoken about their relationship in this one scene and this one moment that it made seeing it in theaters 8 times in theaters worth it.

#oh god #the way they have their own quiet physical language because neither of them use words unless necessary #she’ll gesture to her nose to warn him his is bleeding #and he can square his shoulders and immediately she switches back from private/emotional mode to lady sword soldier mode #private little reminders and ways of speaking to each other #i just #asdfghj

(via rob-anybody)

Photoset

quigonejinn:

falulatonks:

Raleigh looking at Mako

#to fight monsters we created soulmates

#sometimes i think about mako’s reaction to this whole situation (the bilingual stubbly supportive golden retriever situation) and i laugh and laugh and laugh #because if anyone has mused on the many consequences on drift partnership it’s mako mori #being as it pretty much informs her ENTIRE LIFE #even if she didn’t want to be a pilot ‘more than anything’ it’s still the underlying relationship of every important person in her life #the good (tams and stacks) the bad (hansens v1.0) and the ugly (hansens v2.0) #all her friends are either part of a drift pairing or study drift pairing or work to facilitate drift pairings’ #safe to say she’s read up on the subject #and she KNOWS to pilot Danger she has to pair up #and she KNOWS if this unseen becket person is being brought in that he’s going to be her drift partner #and just considering all the possible styles of human that she’s prepared to accept in order to pilot #and this guy turns up? #it’s like the universe said ok mako we know we’ve given you a bad deal: the world kind of ended before you really got a chance to enjoy it #and then we took your parents #and then we gave your new dad a terminal illness #so yeah fair enough you’re heavy in the minus column #but here #WE GOT YOU A PRESENT #HE’S BRAVE AND TRUE AND LOVES YOU LIKE THE SUN MOON AND STARS TOGETHER #AND HE’S TALL AND WELL-SHAPED #AND HE’S A LITTLE BIT BROKEN BUT STILL GOOD #YEAH #STILL GOOD #(and oh. no. now i’ve created an AU where mako is stitch claiming her little broken stacker and raleigh family don’t look at me) #(oh noooooooooo) (via harrietvane)

(Source: leepacey, via theumbrellaseller)

Text

pyrrhiccomedy:

pikestaff:

This town in Russia is called Zheleznogorsk.

Their flag and coat of arms is a bear splitting the atom.

image

That is all.

*kicks down door, knocks over end table, vase crashes to the floor*

No that is NOT all, because Zheleznogorsk is really interesting.

It was a secret city, established in 1950 in the middle of Nowhere, Siberia for the purpose of researching nuclear weaponry and producing massive quantities of plutonium, the facilities for which were hidden inside a hollowed-out mountain. It appeared on no maps, and had no census data. Although more than 100,000 people lived there at one point, satellite imagery would have shown only a fairly small mining town. The mountain complex contained 3,500 rooms and three plutonium reactors, which were kept cool by one of the mightiest river in Siberia. The space had been excavated by tens of thousands of gulag slave laborers, who removed more rock from inside the mountain than was used to build the Great Pyramids. Protected under the granite peak of the mountain, these facilities would survive a direct nuclear attack.

'Zheleznogorsk' was not its official name until after the collapse of the USSR. Before that, it was known on official paperwork as “Krasnoyarsk-26,” which is something like naming a city 'Arizona-17.' Residents traveling outside the city colloquially called it Iron Town, if they had to refer to it at all. They were under strict instructions never to reveal to anyone the actual business of Krasnoyarsk-26. 

And life there was fantastic. People living and working in the secret city received some of the best wages in the Soviet Union. There were sports stadiums, public gardens, a movie theater, and the shortages notorious in the rest of the USSR were unknown. The best nuclear scientists in Russia lived in a sealed-off utopia. 

A third of all the nuclear weapons produced in Russia during the Cold War were powered by fuel from Zheleznogorsk. At the time, the image of the great Russian bear ripping an atom apart wouldn’t have seemed very funny at all.

(via bending-sickle)

Tags: history!
Text

Stereotypes, Tropes, and Archetypes

writeworld:

What are the differences between stereotypes, tropes, and archetypes? What are they? How do writers use them? Let’s take a look at some vocabulary and how we define these terms to make sense of them for ourselves.

Stereotype (n): A widely held but fixed and oversimplified image or idea of a particular type of person or thing.

To elaborate on this, stereotypes can be seen as sets of characteristics or behaviors that are commonly associated with one another, thus making it easier to intuit some of them if one or more is known. Stereotypes, though, are not literary. They refer to beliefs held about groups in reality, not types of characters. The literary cousin of the stereotype is the trope.

Trope (n): devices and conventions that a writer can reasonably rely on as being present in the audience members’ minds and expectations.

If tropes seem a little too much like to stereotypes for comfort, that’s because, technically speaking, they are stereotypes. “A Trope is a stereotype that writers find useful in communicating with readers.” (x) However, because the word stereotype has become so stigmatized in society, we prefer to think of tropes as specific to storytelling.

You use tropes in your writing. It is nearly impossible to escape them. And that is okay.

Tropes are things that pop up repeatedly in media as cultural norms in storytelling—types of characters, settings, plot lines, etc.. Stuff like a Manic Pixie Dream Girl who exists to usher a male character to his higher level of emotional awareness or personal growth, or a case of Mistaken Identity where Hilarity Ensues. Tropes are culturally-based, which is what sets them apart from archetypes.

Archetype (n): a very typical example of a certain person or thing; types that fit fundamental human motifs.

An archetype is a kind of character that pops up in stories all over the place. A trope is a character that puts that archetype in a cultural context.

For instance, let’s say you have a character who is a Geek. The role of a Geek in literature is a trope, because it is common in a certain culture (i.e. Western, though depictions of the Geek will vary within Western Civilization as well). Broadly and therefore in terms of an archetype, the Geek is the Scholar, a person who is constantly in search of knowledge. Various stereotypes about the Geek (like poor social skills) might then be inferred by characters or readers based on their understanding of the society in which they live.

It’s important to mention that none of these things are necessarily clichés.

Cliché (n):

  1. A trite or overused expression or idea; often a vivid depiction of an abstraction that relies upon analogy or exaggeration for effect, often drawn from everyday experience.
  2. A person or character whose behavior is predictable or superficial.

For more about clichés, mosey over to this post. Essentially, clichés are boring and overdone by definition, but tropes and archetypes can be useful. Yes, this is a subjective distinction.

So here’s the breakdown:

  • Stereotypes: Not literary. We avoid using this term to talk about classifying characters, settings, plot points, etc..
  • Archetypes: The broad, all-encompassing norms of the stories humanity tells. The same archetypes can be found in all or nearly all cultures.
  • Tropes: Culturally-specific norms in storytelling. Tropes are cultural classifications of archetypes. There can be many tropes found under the umbrella of one archetype. Literary devices are not tropes (i.e. narrators, foreshadowing, flashbacks, etc.).
  • Clichés: Overused and hackneyed phrases, characters, settings, plot points, etc.. Archetypes do not become clichéd. Tropes can become clichés if they are used too often and readers get bored of them. Clichés are defined by a loss of the meaning or as a distraction from the story.

Let’s focus on tropes and archetypes now as these terms are often used as a sort of shorthand when writing. Once you have firmly introduced a character as one type of archetype and/or a trope within that archetype, you do not have to elaborate on the character as much before moving on in the storyline.

While this can be useful and can help keep a section moving, it can also be very lazy, can help to perpetuate unhealthy stereotypes that carry over into the real world, and can make for one-dimensional characters. All of this forces the readers to focus on the way the story is being told instead of the story itself. Not good.

Here are some questions to keep in mind when using trope and archetypes in writing:

  • Is this derogatory? Does this demean or belittle? Is it harmful to the reader? For instance, the Dumb Blonde trope from American culture can assume that all blondes are easily-fooled, flighty, and even promiscuous. In the real world, the Dumb Blonde trope certainly translates into a derogatory stereotype, so is it something you want to use in your writing or can you manipulate the trope to create something unexpected?
  • Is this really necessary? Do you actually need to use a trope or archetype as a base for your character to keep the flow moving or the characters easy to remember, or are you using it so you don’t have to bother to give your character, well, character? Laziness is no excuse for poor writing. Using a trope can flatten a character very quickly if that’s all that they have going for them. There’s even a term for a character whose personality is limited to a single trope; they’re called stock characters.
  • Is this actually the one I want? Perhaps the empty headed and hot cheerleader trope is not the one you want. Maybe the secretly hot booksmart nerd is a better fit for your story. Maybe not. Really think about what base characteristics you give your characters, because they an come in handy farther down the storyline. Browsing tropes is fun, but at the end of the day, try combining character traits to create something that is unique for you is what makes a character worth writing.
  • Am I using this to bash someone? While almost all tropes can be harmful in one way or another, how you present them can have a big effect on whether or not you are actually using a trope or are pulling away from your story to offer the reader a stereotype instead. Being nasty because of someone else’s perceived shortcomings won’t help your story, and, if that’s not enough reason, it can be harmful to you because people will call you on it. Depth is key.
  • How can I use this in a way that is helpful? By making your characters more personalized and three-dimensional, you humanize them and give the reader a better chance of empathizing with them. In Creative Writing Tip: Avoiding Stereotypes, Matthew Arnold Stern says:
    The antidote to stereotypes is to create well-rounded characters with clear and human motivation. Even a character who appears briefly in a story can benefit from depth and complexity. Such characters add realism and depth that draws us further into the story.
    Choose a base trope or archetype for a character, and then elaborate on it in a way that breaks expectations or defies convention. A shy, sweet, nerdy girl who is not afraid to loudly tell someone to stop when she is uncomfortable and is happy with who she is could be a much more interesting character then the throw away filler character of a compliant, scared bookworm. A big, popular jock who is not afraid to stand up against bullying and treats his parents and teachers with respect has more hidden depth than the usual sneering bullies that populate literary sports fields.

All in all, archetypes and tropes can be a handy writing tool when used sparingly, but we have to remember that the stereotypes we perpetuate in our writing resonate with people in real life.

Speaking in terms of subject matter and not story construction, stereotypes have their place in literature, so long as the writer and the reader are completely aware of the fact that they are being used. Perhaps you are using a stereotype so you can later break it in an interesting way as a plot device, or you are driving it home as a stereotype that you feel is justified. For instance, there is the stereotype that drug dealers are dangerous and violent. The fact that anyone who is actively complicit in illegal activities is potentially dangerous is true, and it probably is best to avoid and not trust someone whose livelihood revolves around convincing you to break the law.

In Is Stereotyping Bad?, Brittney Weber said:

"Stereotypes have the potential to show a member of a particular group how to behave or how others believe they do. The latter may be apparent in the way they are treated by society at large, while the former encourages them to remain within the confines of that definition."

So think before you write, and be considerate of the effect your writing may have on others, as well as the effect that devices like tropes can have on your writing.

Further Reading: 

-Ji, O, and C

(via bending-sickle)

Photo
aplacetolovedogs:

Happy piglet getting lots of sweet kisses from some adorable Jack Russell puppies
For more cute dogs and puppies

aplacetolovedogs:

Happy piglet getting lots of sweet kisses from some adorable Jack Russell puppies

For more cute dogs and puppies

(via stingerhouse)

Tags: gosh doggie!
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kissmyasajj:

fuckyeahwarriorwomen:

duckindolans:

daughterofmulan:

theblindninja:

The Pirates Official Posters

What is this glorious looking glory.

WHAT IS THIS

Pirates (2014 film)

Set in the early Joseon Dynasty, a group led by a female pirate and another group led by a male bandit are on a mission to hunt down a whale that swallowed the royal seal bestowed on Joseon from China.

Yes!

(via bending-sickle)

Chat
  • me to all my friends: YOU CAN DO IT. YOU MAKE YOUR OWN LIFE. LET'S DO THIS TOGETHER. COME ON!!!
  • me to myself: you fucking piece of shit you will amount to nothing nothing is worth it your feelings are irrational go sleep for 22 hours
Tags: YES HELLO ugh